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OpsMgr 2012 - DeleteDisabledDiscoverySources

Back again for a short post regarding a resent event I experienced. I have been tidying up my lab to prepare for an upgrade test I have been waiting to complete. Prior to the upgrade I wanted to remove some of the management packs what was targeted to IIS on some of my servers. Usually this is done by:
  1. Create a new ManagementPack (IIS7.disabled.xml)
  2. Create a new group and target it to the newly created MP (IIS7.disabled.xml)
  3. Disable the discovery rules for IIS7 and target the new Group
This should prevent the members of the group to “apply” the managementpack, however the the servers will still show up in views that target IIS7 MP. To remove these objects from the view, we need to run a powershell SCOM-cmdlet called Remove-SCOMDisabledClassInstance. So off I went and loaded the OperationsManager Module in my always open powershell console window and fired off the cmdlet. It threw the usual warning message at me:

image

I sat back and was planning to enjoy my coffee, when this message said hello:

Remove-SCOMDisabledClassInstance : Discovery data has been received from a rule targeted at a non-existent object ID.
Object ID: 172d24e6-1c99-d334-7ac2-ae0c160a4ae9
Rule ID: f6d8a11c-0585-3cc8-ecd3-3a0c34aadad0
At line:1 char:33
+ remove-scomdisabledclassinstance <<<<
    + CategoryInfo          : InvalidOperation: (Microsoft.Syste...nstancesCommand:RemoveSCDisabledClassInstancesComma
   nd) [Remove-SCOMDisabledClassInstance], DiscoveryDataFr...ObjectException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : ExecutionError,Microsoft.SystemCenter.OperationsManagerV10.Commands.RemoveSCDisabledClas
   sInstancesCommand


Okay, no problem. I have the IDs for the rule and object. Armed with this I went to work in powershell and came back with nothing. These were not “SCOM-GUIDs”. They are operationsmanager database GUIDs. Not prepared to do raw hacking in my operations database, I went and visited my good friend gOOgle. That didn’t really help much until I discovered this post:

http://myitforum.com/cs2/blogs/momlist/archive/2009/04/06/msmom-re-object-discovery-kj8dggiwa3.aspx

Conclution; Proceed to run the cmdlet a few times and see what happens?
Off I went, and behold after running the command 4 times, it completed successfully:

image

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