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Bulk Import Operations Manager 2012 Management Packs

Read a post today from Joe Thompson regarding this subject. Really liked the idea with bulk import of Management Packs. The scenario is like this: You have a folder or several folders with a bunch of Management Packs and you want to install only those that is currently not installed.

I hope Mr Thompson does not mind me changing his Powershell script and "improving" it slightly if you ask me :-)

[cmdletbinding()]
Param
(
    [ValidateScript({Test-Path $_ -PathType 'Container'})]
    [string] $ManagementPacksPath
)

Write-Verbose "Creating an array of file names from the path $ManagementPacksPath"
$MPfiles = (Get-Item -Path "$ManagementPacksPath\*" -Include *.mp*).Name
[int]$CountMatching = 0
$InstallList = @()

foreach($MP in $MPfiles)
{
    Write-Verbose "Getting MP properties using SCOM cmdlet and the parameter 'ManagementPackFile'"
    $MPproperties = Get-SCOMManagementPack -ManagementPackFile "$ManagementPacksPath\$MP"
    $CountMatching = 1

    Write-Verbose "Checking if Management Pack is installed"
    $CountMatching = (Get-SCOMManagementPack -id $MPproperties.id.guid | Measure-Object).Count
    Write-Verbose "Get-SCOMManagementPack returned $CountMatching MPs with id $($MPproperties.id.guid)"
    
    if ($CountMatching -eq 0)
    {
        Write-Verbose "Adding $MP to the install list"
        $InstallList += $MP
    }
}

if($InstallList.count -gt 0)
{
    Write-Verbose "Installing Management Packs in folder $ManagementPacksPath"
    Import-SCOMManagementPack -Fullname $InstallList -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
}
else
{
    Write-Verbose "InstallList is empty, all Management Packs in folder $ManagementPacksPath is installed"
}

What changed you ask? Well I am a bit particular about Powershell scripts and like to use [cmdletbinding()] since that gives med the option to use the Write-Verbose cmdlet and use logging when I want it by adding the –Verbose parameter to my scripts/functions. 

Secondly Operations Manager has the cmdlet Get-SCOMManagementPack which has a parameter called ManagementPackFile. This makes it possible to “load” the Management Pack in a variable and access all the properties like it was installed, thus we can use the Management Pack GUID to check against the installed Management Packs in Operations Manager. Makes it a little more robust and proper if you ask me. 

Thirdly I like to use parameter validation and this gave me a opportunity to use a special one:

[ValidateScript({Test-Path $_ -PathType 'Container'})]

By decorating the parameter with this entry, you will receive a nice warning if you assigned a non-excising path as a parameter to the script file. Look ma, no If-statement.

Mr Thompson also mentioned a DSC resource he is working on. Would be kind of cool to do a "ENSURE" on a Management Pack. Looking forward to reading more about that later.

In a future post I might expand this a little to check for version match and using the powershell Management Pack download tool (finding MP).

Cheers

Comments

  1. Tore, great improvements to the script, don't mind at all! I have also started a community DSC Resource collection for System Center. This enhanced script would definitely be an improvement if added to the MP Bulk Import DSC Resource I've already written... https://github.com/PowerShellOrg/DSC/tree/master/Resources/cSystemCenterManagement

    Joe

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you for sharing this information. I find this information is easy to understand and very useful. Thumbs up!


    Melbourne App Developer
    (10 URL)

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