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Pester Operational Tests


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I have created yet another GitHub repro "PesterOperationTest". Feels like I do this every week, however that is not the case.

But why?

The purpose of this repository is to collect Pester Unit tests for your infrastructure. Anything that is mission critical for you business deserves a tests that validates the correct configuration. It will make you sleep like a baby and stop worrying when you implement a change in your environment if you tests pass.

This will only become as good as the contribution you make to the repository. I would love to do all the work myself, however there is not enough time in the world. Think of it like you are helping yourself and at the same time a lot of other people could benefit from the test you create.

How?

My original thought was to organize this in folders, one for each vendor and with subfolders for each products and/or feature. The scripts will be published to the Powershell Gallery for easy and convenient access for everyone. The tests should not be specific to your environment, however as generic as possible.

My first contribution

Been working for some time now with Forefront Identity Manager. The last 6 months has changed a lot in terms of how I work and what tools I use. Pester – a unit test framework included in Windows 10 (and in Windows Server 2016) – has become one of my key assets. Heck it has made me better at my work and increased the value added for my customers. Thank you Pester!

I have published a first version of the Microsoft Identity Manager Test to the repro. It validates important stuff like


  • files/folders that need to be present
  • services that should be running and configured the proper way
  • scheduled task that should/could be enabled and configured

I will be adding more stuff later. Pull requests are welcome!

Cheers

Tore

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